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Thread: Trans-Tasman speculation

  1. #256
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyS View Post
    I've said it before, but I have never understood why Foxtel has never used FTA content as an advertising opportunity. As in show one regular game/match/race/etc, but stuff it full of ads pointing out that all the content is on PTV. Especially when they are trying to establish Kayo and get some credibility/transitioning to streaming.
    Innovative thinking. Like some newspaper paywalls allow you to sample for free a certain number of items per month. I find it frustrating that the West Australian newspaper do not, so if I ever buy a newspaper it is one of those that I have got used to on the web. Or if I was tempted to subscribe to a newspaper, it would not be for the The West.

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  2. #257
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    Possible movement in NZ.

    Highlanders CEO says trans-Tasman Super Rugby will start in 2021

    Damian Rowe
    20:16, Oct 29 2020

    Highlanders chief executive Roger Clark​ says the upcoming Super Rugby season will include Australian teams.

    Clark, speaking at a Southland Chamber of Commerce event in Invercargill on Thursday, said the 2021 season would involve two rounds of Super Rugby Aotearoa before New Zealand sides cross the ditch to play Australian teams, which would be announced shortly.

    The reason for this was that broadcast deals would be just as strong if it tried to play other teams in Argentina and Africa, Clark said.

    “I think in ‘21, you’ll find it will be us and the Australians and in 2022 you’ll find Fiji and a Pasifika team fall into that competition.”

    Earlier this month, NZ Rugby chairman Brent Impey confirmed Super Rugby Aotearoa would continue in 2021, with finals following a two-round competition involving the existing five New Zealand franchises.

    He hoped a “crossover” competition with Australia would follow.

    There was talk of a local competition with the Fiji and Pasifika teams but there was also talk of a regional club competition every two years with Japan, South Africa, Argentina, Clark said.

    Then every four years there would a global north vs south competition to discover which would be the best club team in the world, he said.

    “I think what you’ll find going forward is instead of us travelling around the world to play a game which most people think is pretty mad anyway, to play one game of footy to travel all the way to Africa.

    “That’ll find every couple of years we might play the Africans and the Argentines, but every four years you’ll end up having a challenge, which you’ll see which is the best club team in the world.”

    From fans’ and broadcasters’ perspectives it was something that would be very exciting, he said.

    A member of the audience asked if there would be any afternoon games next season.

    Clark said there were at least three, maybe four, afternoon games. It was not something that broadcasters liked but it was great for the fans and crowd attendance.

    Another member asked if there would be five Australian teams?

    From Clark’s understanding there would be the existing five Australian teams which they were still to announce a broadcast deal for.

    Fiji had backing for a team which would come in 2022 and there would be a Pasifika team which would be a mixture of Samoa and Tonga.

    https://i.stuff.co.nz/sport/rugby/su...-start-in-2021

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  3. #258
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    Worth a read

    Knife Edge: How will NZ Rugby survive 2021?

    Richard Knowler
    Nov 01 2020, 05:00

    New Zealand professional sport is on the knife edge, as coronavirus meddles with tournaments, sapping revenue, crowds and broadcasting rights so crucial for paying the bills.

    In Britain, Prime MInister Boris Johnson has “paused” plans for a partial return of sports fans to stadiums. UK sports say that will cause “irreparable damage” to them and the community. Might that happen here?

    Stuff’s Knife Edge series, which started last Sunday, looks at the future of professional sport in New Zealand. How long can professional sport survive in current conditions; will it need lifebuoys thrown to keep afloat; just how important is a trans-Tasman bubble?

    It wasn’t a happy coincidence that NZ Rugby happened to have $93 million stored away when Covid-19 struck in March.

    The money in the form of cash, term investments and managed funds was set aside as insurance to the event of an unforeseen financial crisis, and when the mighty crash came NZ Rugby could at least take comfort from knowing it wouldn’t be wiped out.

    That didn’t mean it wasn’t forced to act swiftly, and make brutal decisions. NZ Rugby, like many companies around the globe, asked its 180 staff - including contracted players - to accept pay cuts. Later it culled up to 50 percent of the staff.

    NZ Rugby chairman Brent Impey told media after the annual meeting on April 30 that the financial loss for 2020 would be massive: “I can’t tell you a figure … I will say it’s in the tens of millions of dollars, but a heck of a lot less than the 93 (million dollars) which would take us out.’’

    This was after NZ Rugby had announced a loss of $7.4 million for 2019, an improvement on the budgeted loss of $11.8 million. The damage caused by the pandemic has been horrendous, and the ripple effect through to 2021 and beyond will be significant.

    Super Rugby was shuttered in mid-March, the inbound tests against Wales and Scotland were scrapped and the Rugby Championship has been reduced to a three-team Tri Nations competition because the Springboks have refused to participate.

    Adding to the mayhem, NZ Rugby lost the Rugby Championship hosting rights to Australia. There will be no northern tour, either. Fewer games mean reduced payments from broadcaster Sky, as well as a drop in income from ticket sales and advertising from home fixtures.

    The birth of Super Rugby Aotearoa, in conjunction with crowds attending under alert level 1 was a saviour for the 5 clubs; NZ Rugby was grateful it could offer Sky content in the form of SRA, Mitre 10 and the Farah Palmer Cups and the two Bledisloe Cup tests in New Zealand. It was like a ray of bright light in the gloom, while the remainder of the sporting world watched with envy.

    When Impey was asked after the annual meeting about how much of its cash reserves it could drill into, he said boards generally have a policy and that NZ Rugby’s was “broadly’’ 40 percent of its fixed operating costs.

    “With a [potential] two-thirds drop in revenue, we’ve also had to bring costs down. We’re looking at a multi-million dollar loss this year, but we’ve got ourselves into a position where we’re able to come forward into next year.’’

    You need optimism at a time like this. Prior to Covid-19 that $93 million would have been considered a tidy nest egg. When the dirt hit the fan, it became a saviour as NZ Rugby braced for a 70 percent decline in revenue.

    Chief financial officer Nicki Nicol reiterated: “This strong cash position at year-end and robust application of our reserves policy has allowed some much needed respite to support the organisation with revenue shocks associated with Covid-19.’’

    What does 2021 hold in store for NZ Rugby? It’s a question CEO Mark Robinson, Impey and his board will no doubt be asking themselves on a regular basis. So much is still beyond their control. The dates for Super Rugby Aotearoa, to be followed by a proposed competition against the 5 Australian sides, have yet to be confirmed. As for a test programme, we have heard zilch. The tests are a major money spinner for NZ Rugby; it’s what broadcasters and audiences crave but the task of shipping an All Blacks squad across borders will remain a complex affair.

    Given the British and Irish Lions tour of South Africa next year may not go ahead, it’s uncertain whether the All Blacks will be able to have a crack at the world champions in the Republic in 2021.

    NZ Rugby could ask the Players’ Association to ask the players to accept a reduced wage packet to help slash costs, but it won’t want to alienate them and push them offshore.

    Don’t forget the provincial unions, either. Even before the pandemic, many PUs from the Mitre 10 Cup and Heartland competitions were struggling. To retain their identities, and remain relevant, the Mitre 10 Cup provinces, who contract players directly, appear certain to ask the Players’ Association to amend the collective bargaining agreement so that players are paid less. Because without this, PUs could go to the wall. Again, this is fraught with negative connotations, because rather than stay in New Zealand the talent may head overseas.

    Last year was a record year of investment into rugby in this country, with $195 million, a 2 percent growth over 2018, being poured back into the game. International and domestic competitions, players and teams accounted for just over three-quarters of expenditure.

    When Sky NZ renewed its broadcast deal with NZ Rugby to screen content such as All Blacks, Super Rugby and Mitre 10 Cup games, reported to be worth around $400 million over 5 years, it was awarded 5 percent of the company’s shares as part of the new relationship.

    The balance sheet notes the investment was recognised on November 1 at an acquisition fair value of $19.4 million. On that same date Sky disclosed it had issued NZ Rugby 21,801,325 shares at 89 cents.

    This week those shares were valued at around 15 cents, reducing NZ Rugby’s investment, which must be held for a minimum of 2 years before they can be sold, to $3,270,198.

    It’s a black eye NZ Rugby could do without, given everything else that has happened since it confirmed that deal. But it’s in for the long haul on the score, as it is in terms of trying to protect and nurture the sport in his country.

    Sacrifices will need to future-proof the game here. The question is where, and for how long. As Impey said after the annual meeting, it just “poured like hell’’.

    https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/rugby/...y-survive-2021

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  4. #259
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    Interesting reading about NZ Rugby being on a financial knife edge, after starting the 2020 COVID19 period with a handy $93 cushion.

    I was chatting recently to a well connected WA rugby man and we wondered how the hell the RA, NSWRU, QLD, and the VRU were surviving financially, when they were already in the poo when COVID came along? And we commented how lucky the Force and RugbyWA to have Twiggy supporting us.

    My well connected friend said he could only guess that Twiggy was already propping up the RA on the promise of future RA reforms. I wonder?

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  5. #260
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    Didn't Scomo just give RA a shitload of money to help with their bid for the Rugby World Cup.I'm sure some of it will be used to prop up the other states.

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  6. #261
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    The Bronze Star of Faith TWF Contributor!
    You can only applaud NZR (and the AFL) for their foresight whatever happens from here on in. RA is it's usual clusterf@ck. The NRL has shown itself to be just as incompetent as RA. They were broke when covid hit, despite record rights deals. They had to look OS for a $75 mil sub as OZ lenders would not go near them. F@ack knows what terms they had to cop just to stay afloat.

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  7. #262
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    Bit more on a Trans-Tasman.

    Powerbrokers discuss options for trans-Tasman Super Rugby in 2021

    By Sam Phillips
    November 2, 2020 — 7.45pm

    The Wallabies' record-breaking loss to the All Blacks at the weekend may have a silver lining, with Australian and New Zealand rugby bosses discussing options for a trans-Tasman Super Rugby competition in 2021.

    New Zealand Rugby were initially not interested in any form of trans-Tasman competition in 2021 - citing COVID-19 concerns - but after Rugby Australia agreed to move a Bledisloe Test from December 12 to October 31 at New Zealand's request, a concession was made and discussions began.

    RA held its member union update on Wednesday and one of the items high on the agenda for the states was the format of next year's Super Rugby competition.

    As it stands, clubs will begin pre-season in a fortnight without clarity as to what the competition will look like in 2021, and whether Australian and New Zealand Super Rugby franchises will face each other.

    At the bare minimum, Australian clubs anticipate the winner of Super Rugby AU will face the winner of Super Rugby Aotearoa at the end of their 12-week seasons.

    But multiple sources have told the Herald Super franchises from both countries want more than just the one crossover match, before a full return to a trans-Tasman tournament in 2022.

    Multiple formats have been discussed by clubs for next year, all of which would require free trans-Tasman movement being opened up.

    Several formats for an extended cross-over finals are being looked at, and so too is a trans-Tasman knockout competition, which would take place after the respective domestic seasons.

    Formats are also being discussed that would see Australian and New Zealand teams play in regular-season competition, albeit within the framework of a shortened season.

    One of the formats would see Super Rugby AU and Super Rugby Aotearoa played for a period before two trans-Tasman competitions are run side-by-side, with the 10 Australian and New Zealand franchises split into pools of five.

    After playing a round-robin, either the top two from each group could square off in the semi-finals, or the winner of each pool would simply face each other in a grand final.

    RA chair Hamish McLennan is a strong advocate for a trans-Tasman competition in 2021 and Highlanders CEO Roger Clark also revealed his thoughts on the concept late last week.

    "I think in '21, you’ll find it will be us and the Australians and in 2022 you’ll find Fiji and a Pasifika team fall into that competition," Clark said.

    It's believed Nine - who are closing in on a broadcast rights deal with Rugby Australia - are also eager for a trans-Tasman competition to take place.

    Meanwhile, the Wallabies will almost certainly be without Lukhan Salakaia-Loto for the fourth and final Bledisloe Cup Test of the year.

    The towering lock suffered an ankle injury in the 43-5 loss to the All Blacks at ANZ Stadium on Saturday. Coach Dave Rennie has called in Cadeyrn Neville as second-row cover.

    Rennie will have to choose between veteran Rob Simmons, uncapped Rebels prospect Trevor Hosea or Neville as his replacement for Salakaia-Loto, who was one of the Wallabies' best ball carriers in the first two Bledisloe Tests.

    https://www.smh.com.au/sport/rugby-u...02-p56auc.html

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  8. #263
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    The Force started pre-season training 2 weeks ago, where as that writer above is saying the others Aussie teams only start in another 2 weeks time?
    So the Force will be 4 weeks ahead in their training.

    The Tahs 2020 Super season ended the same day as the Force, or actually a week before that as they had a bye in the last round.

    Maybe they cannot expect the players to train if they do not have signed contracts, because there are no signed CH9 or Fox TV contracts with the RA?.

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  9. #264
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chopper1 View Post
    Didn't Scomo just give RA a shitload of money to help with their bid for the Rugby World Cup.I'm sure some of it will be used to prop up the other states.
    That was peanuts compared to the £300 million plus the French paid for their bid.

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    'I may be a Senator but I am not stupid'


    https://omny.fm/shows/the-alan-jones-breakfast-show/cameron-clyne

    Link to Senate Report http://www.aph.gov.au/senate_ca

    https://www.change.org/p/rugby-australia-petition-for-cameron-clyne-to-resign-as-chairman-of-the-rugby-australia-board

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